Welcome to City Lights Antique Lighting. City Lights first opened its doors in 1975, and for over 30 years, we have had the largest and finest collection of antique chandeliers and wall sconces in New England. City Lights sells both American and European lighting focusing on these styles: Aesthetic movement, Rococo, French Empire, Deco, and Victorian, as well as chandeliers we ornament to our own design.

We strive to find the best examples of each style.

Home > Blog > Tall Tales from the Antiques Trail

TALL TALES FROM THE ANTIQUES TRAIL

TRUE STORIES BY ANTIQUE DEALERS

I Am Steamed

by Chris Osborne

Sunday, January 2, 2011

a-steam-4

Steampunked that is.  After two years selling articulated workshop lamps and multi-socket clusters, flat white shades and caged trouble lights to the New York industrial crowd I went over to the dark side.  May of last year I had an opportunity to buy a group of industrial sewing machine lamps perfect for the fabrication of customized industrial style table and floor lamps.  After picking up some cast iron gears, belt wheels, and spigot handles at my local flea, I attached them to the sewing lights in the manner of many dealers servicing the new passion for industrial style.  Even though...

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Consumed or Consuming

by Chris Osborne

Sunday, September 5, 2010

Consumed or Consuming By Christopher Osborne   I shop for a living.  I am an antique dealer.  I also sell but it is the searching, digging, discovering, and acquiring that draws me to my profession.  Stepping into a disused nineteenth century barn, descending into the basement of a neglected old house, prying open the cobweb-sealed lid of a steamer trunk shoved in the eaves of an attic, these are my frontiers, my urban archeology.  I spend hours on the road going from antique shop to antique shop, flea market to flea market.  I even keep an eye on the trash stacked by the curb. ...

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Of Shops and Dogs

by Chris Osborne

Sunday, September 5, 2010

Of Shops and Dogs By Christopher Osborne   At the time, 1970 I was twenty-one, when the owner of an antique shop threw my stepfather and me out of his store, I did not know that I would eventually become an antique dealer.    It seems I’d always liked old stuff, I’d even sold a few things scavenged from my job at Morgan Memorials, but I really didn’t consider antiques a viable occupation for me.  Workin’ on my cool, not workin’ for the man, was where I was at.   My mother and stepfather, Ernie, lived in New York and I visited them often just...

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When Thirty-Five is Not Thirty-five

by Chris Osborne

Sunday, September 5, 2010

munakata

When Thirty-five is not Thirty-five By Christopher Osborne   This is the story of my mother’s greatest success in the antiques business. When my mother and stepfather moved from New York to New Hampshire in 1978, they both started dabbling in antiques.  Like many retirees, the antiques business became an excuse to fill the house with stuff, as they bought and kept ten items for every one they sold.  For my stepfather, who started acquiring sterling, it was an “investment.”  For my mother, who haunted auctions until the bitter end buying box-lots of kitchen utensils, knick-knacks, costume jewelry, and photos, it was borderline compulsive. ...

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Sundays at the Norton flea Market (Part one)

by Chris Osborne

Tuesday, June 16, 2009

flea

By Chris Osborne/Citylights   It is the first Sunday of April, opening day.  I must get to the flea market before dawn.  If my car is not the first one in the parking lot, I feel I have already missed the best stuff.  I tell myself this is a ridiculous feeling.  It doesn’t help.  In the dim light, I can just make out what looks like bears looting a campsite fumbling with furniture, and pawing through boxes.  I park the car and pull from the backseat my broken-in black leather coat bought at Goodwill and the brief case with a sign “Maxfield...

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